Dear sculpture enthusiasts:
The 11th edition of SculpturesPacific magazine is in the works and will be published on March 26th.
If you would like to announce an upcoming show or event that is happening within the next 3-4 months please share it with us. We have room for a maximum of 10 announcements on a first come first served basis. Deadline is Monday the 23rd. Please limit to 50 words and an image would be great.
Send to:
artsportal@shaw.ca

Should public art galleries demand academic credentials before they show your work?

                                                           Academic inflation.
     Should public art galleries demand academic credentials before they show your work?

This is an important question for the art world. I put this question out recently and I received some very strong reactions from many artists. There have been rumours that many public art galleries do indeed ask for this accreditation before they allow exhibition by artists. I have contacted a few public galleries in major cities and asked if this is the case with their particular gallery. Most said no, but when asked how may “unaccredited ’artists they had shown in the recent past, gallery directors could remember very few if any at all who did not have accreditation.

According to a few of my readers this has become a real problem for artists in Europe as well as North America. One reader said that he found it endemic and therefore a real problem for those not accredited.

All major public art galleries use professional staff curators who have academic credentials. This is a good thing. Is it possible though that those public art gallery curators equate their own academic degree with excellence and therefore equate artists without degrees or diplomas as not of equal value to those artists who have degrees?

Wikipedia states “Art criticism is the discussion or evaluation of visual art. Art critics usually critisise art in the context of aesthetics or the theory of beauty. A goal of art criticism is the pursuit of a rational basis for art appreciation but it is questionable whether such criticism can transcend prevailing socio-political circumstances.” I must agree. Academia definitely follows set trends, and those who do not conform to the many “isims” are often labelled outsiders. This may or may not be healthy. I’m inclined to think that some opening up needs to happen in order for the academic world to become more inclusive.

Jock Hildebrand has been a working sculptor for more than 40 years and has contributed to public art around the world with his work. Jock is the senior editor and founder of SculpturesPacific Magazine. He has organized and worked in many international sculpture symposium and was the founder of the 2002 Okanagan Thompson International Sculpture Symposium (with a budget of 2.2 million dollars) .
Sculpture by Jock Hildebrand
SculpturesPacific Magazine

Free issue of SculpturesPacific E-zine

Hi
I’m writing to you about our magazine “SculpturesPacific”. This E-zine has been a labour of love for all of its now 10 issues.

We have moved to a subscriber format in order to make a breakeven point. We hope you will support us and other sculptors we will feature in the magazine by taking out a subscription. It is not expensive and we will need every subscriber we can get in order to continue.
You may go to   SculpturesPacific Magazine    to subscribe and to get our last free issue.

We hope you can support us, and it would help if you can pass this message along to those you feel would be interested in sculpture.

We do have PayPal on the website or if you wish, you may send a cheque, detail on website also.
I hope you will consider this,

Jock Hildebrand has been a working sculptor for more than 40 years and has contributed to public art around the world with his work. Jock is the senior editor and founder of SculpturesPacific Magazine. He has organized and worked in many international sculpture symposium and was the founder of the 2002 Okanagan Thompson International Sculpture Symposium (with a budget of 2.2 million dollars)

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Sculpture by Jock Hildebrand
SculpturesPacific Magazine
About Sculpture Blog.

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There are no shortcuts unless you happen to be at the right place at the right time. And that’s never happened to me.

Marketing your sculpture

I recently had an email sent to me in my role as editor of our sculpture magazine, SculpturesPacific. I was asked how had I managed to make a living as a sculptor, and would I have any advice?
I do get these letters quite often.

Making a living as a sculptor is all about marketing. Fortunately for all of us, we now have the internet and it seems to be the best place to present your art. Careful collection of contacts and the ability to make good long lasting relationships around the world using the internet is a powerful tool. Accumulating these contacts needs to be carefully done. There is utterly no sense sending information about your work unless it’s going to be looked at, so do research those you wish to inform. Start with your current clients and friends. Design a methodical sales and PR program. Stick with it, changing it as needed.

As well consider applying to be put on municipal public art call lists, and search out free public art mailing lists. This gives you the opportunity to scope out which opportunities are appropriate for you and your style. Generally these opportunities are presented as RFP’s or RFQ’s (requests for proposals and requests for qualifications).

People who are interested in you work when you present it on Facebook and LinkedIn are likely contacts for you to follow up on. These and other social media platforms present unlimited opportunity for making valuable contacts.

And of course you need a professional web site. This is often your first opportunity to present yourself, so don’t blow it. Have a really professional website. Don’t do it yourself, get a designer who knows what they are doing. Check out a lot of other websites and show your designer the ones you like. I use my website as a portfolio and can show it anywhere there is a computer or a smart phone, though mostly I send people to it.

Everything I have just written about would seem self evident and common sense, but it never hurts to review your approach. All it takes is lots and lots of work.

It seems to me after 40 years as a professional sculptor, that it is tenacious and persistent marketing which yields results. There are no shortcuts unless you happen to be at the right place at the right time. And that’s never happened to me.

To read more about Jock and his work, check out these websites:

Sculpture: www.jockhildebrand.com
SculpturesPacific Magazine: www.sculpturespacific.com (our sculpture magazine)
About Sculpture, my blog: https://artisjock.wordpress.com

DISCOUNTED ART: Cutting off your nose to spite your face

 

Sculptors work a lot with return, loyal customers, or to put it another way: friends and fans. For them, buying sculpture is a really personal experience. Those who have bought your sculpture believe in your integrity in fair pricing. That’s right – your clients expect integrity in your pricing !! It is very difficult for clients to believe you have this integrity if they see downward fluctuations in the prices you had previously set for existing pieces of sculpture.

Discounting your sculpture can insult or anger those who have enthusiastically bought in the past. Part of the adventure of being an art collector, in addition to truly loving the artwork they have bought, is to watch the dollar value of the work increase over the years. This happens in the natural course of an artist’s long career.

Someone recently contacted me to ask if a painting they found in a second hand store was a “Hildebrand Original”. They were delighted that a painting they found for a couple hundred dollars is now worth a couple thousand, due to a natural increase in the price of my work over the past 40 years.

We do need to treat those who have purchased our work in the past with the greatest respect. Giving a “Deal at Christmas” disrespects not only your customers, but also your work.

This is really an important issue for those who are professionals or want to be. The industry will get respect if it gives respect. As sculptors, we need to introduce professionalism into our field. We need to respect our customers, our work, and our pricing. This is how our fans and buyers also learn about the way we work professionally and come to trust us.

I have often called for more professionalism in our field. This definitely is not about society’s present day approach to commercialism. Selling sculpture out of your gallery or studio is NOT about commercialism. It is a personal relationship with those who care about your art work and especially those who care about you and your career in the arts.

Jock Hildebrand has been a working sculptor for more than 40 years and has contributed to public art around the world with his work. Jock is the senior editor and founder of SculpturesPacific Magazine. He has organized and worked in many international sculpture symposium and was the founder of the 2002 Okanagan Thompson International Sculpture Symposium (with a budget of 2.2 million dollars) .

SculpturesPacific Magazine
Jock Hildebrand’s Sculpture

Why do communities make application difficult? How should public art committees ask for sculpture?

I think this needs to be widely circulated. It’s is a reprint from an article written by my wife, Carmen, in one of our SculpturesPacific magazine editions So, if you find the same difficulties as we do,  pass it along to the public art committee(s) that you deal with, and to other sculptors. Just cut and paste, email, tweet, blog or whatever.
AN IDEAL ARTIST CALL
Through our work (Jock as sculptor of primarily monumental size pieces, and me managing the business side of making art) we respond to many requests for qualifications (RFQ’s) and have also put a few out for our clients. Almost every time we compile our material for submission, we hear ourselves saying, “I wish there was one standardized way in which these are written.” The problem is that in a general sense, everyone asks pretty much for the same information, such as images of past works, a current CV, sometimes an artist statement, etc., but there is no standardized template. Some want 10 images, some up to 20, some want them horizontal, some vertical, some want them labeled this way…some that way… some at this dpi, some at that dpi, some at a particular file size… you get the picture.
So here, for whatever it’s worth, is our ‘in a perfect world’ scenario:
An ideal artist call:
Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all prepare a portfolio that contained the basic information, so that all we need to do is write a cover letter and maybe swap some images in and out for each submission? It doesn’t take much. If a standardized outline for public art call submissions were to be created, our portfolio might include:
• 10 images, minimum 300 dpi, 1280 kb file
• Images labeled with: Artist name, title of the piece, year completed, location, and selling price;
• A current CV;
• 3 references – name, phone # and e-mail;
• Submitted electronically with a cover letter, RFQ # in the subject line.
DONE !!!
Ok – now I’ll get back to the RFQ’s sitting on my desk to figure out if they want the images horizontally and at what dpi, labeled with first name last, or last name first…reference names or reference letters…annotation separate or with images…as a PDF with specified file size, or not…snail mailed or e-mailed…??? Sigh …

Jock Hildebrand has been a working sculptor for more than 40 years and has contributed to public art around the world with his work. Jock is the senior editor and founder of SculpturesPacific Magazine. He has organized and worked in many international sculpture symposium and was the founder of the 2002 Okanagan Thompson International Sculpture Symposium (with a budget of 2.2 million dollars) .
Sculpture by Jock Hildebrand
SculpturesPacific Magazine

“AND THE WINNER IS …..” Where are national and international awards for public sculpture?

“AND THE WINNER IS …..”

Where are national and international awards for public sculpture?

Where are the television gala and radio awards ceremonies for public art and visual artists?
The same reasons that apply to national and international literary awards should also apply to the world of public art. Critically unrecognised, public art and sculpture appear to be bastard children in the world of criticism and recognition. Literary awards, particularly ones with large cash awards such as the Canadian Giller Literary Award attracts huge national interest. I counted at least ten major U.K. literary awards. Why can’t we make people across the country excited about sculpture awards and who will win, nationally and internationally? I think we as the sculpture community can!

Make no mistake, public art occupies prominent public space and volumes of money from public coffers have been spent on it. I’m sure most of the sculpture communities approves of this. There are of course lots of reasons to have accessible art in the community.

What would awards like this do?
• Raise the bar: Sculptors hoping to achieve these national/ international awards could observe critically acclaimed public art pieces. This observation could lead to achieving higher standards, and greater understanding of other sculptural approaches.
• Generate attention, excitement, and interest in the general public about the field of public art.
• Allow much greater public exposure for public art creators.

What can we do to make this happen? As usual everything starts with enthusiasm. National sculpture groups backing the awards would legitimize the endeavour. Next is fundraising. Following the literary awards example, the finding of a benefactor for public sculpture awards. Naming opportunities for sponsors would seem essential.
A number of years ago I started the “Angels Awards for the Arts” in a community I used to live in. I and a group of volunteers ran it for three years. This was the first art award that covered an area with a population of about 450,000 people. It morphed into awards presented by a local art council after I asked someone else to take it over. No reason that can’t be done nationally in which ever country wants to take on such a project !!

for more about Jock
Sculpture: http://www.jockhildebrand.com
Magazine: http://www.sculpturespacific.com

ock Hildebrand
Sculptor and Chief Editor of SculpturesPacific Magazine
www.jockhildebrand.com
www.sculpturespacific.com

Sculptures Pacific is an online magazine focusing on sculpture artists ,published by Accelerate Comm Group